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Cloth 101: Breastfed Baby Poop
August 3, 2014 12:32 pm | by
Prepping Your New Cloth Diapers

1538It’s World Breastfeeding Week, and to celebrate, let’s talk about one of our favorite subjects: POOP! We’re not going to talk about just any poop, though. Instead, we are going through the ins and outs of exclusively breastfed (EBF) baby poo. Now, if you don’t know, a breastfed-baby’s poop is a bit different than a formula-fed baby’s. Here’s what you need to know about EBF (please know that this information does not provide any medical advice).

What’s normal?

  • The color and consistency of poo varies widely in EBF babies. It also varies kid to kid. Babies who are exclusively breastfed will typically have watery stools. This type of poop varies in color (yellow, green, orange brown-ish) and does not have a strong odor. 
  • EBF babies do not have a certain frequency with their bowel movements. They might have several poops a day, or even go a week without pooping. If you experience this, it is important to focus on what your baby’s stool looks like instead of how often your baby poops. As long as everything looks like a normal EBF stool, then this is your baby’s routine.
  • Breastfed baby’s poop is water soluble and very easy to clean! You can literally just toss these dirty diapers in your dry pail or wet bag until laundry day and the mess will come out when you wash your diapers like normal. EBF poo does not *typically* stain, but if you prefer to rinse your diapers clean to help avoid it, feel free.
  • EBF poo is more liquid than solid, and some parents can mistake it for diarrhea because the stool is loose(r). EBF poop can lead to blowouts, which most cloth diapers can contain 😉 The best distinction between diarrhea and EBF poop is seeing a change in the amount, occurrence, fluidity and smell. 

When to Call Your Doctor: 

It is very important to call your doctor immediately if you notice any change in your baby’s stool. Whether it’s the color, smell, frequency, or texture, you MUST contact your physician for guidance. 

 

About the Author

Brittney is a social media coordinator for Cotton Babies. She has three sisters, loves pizza and enjoys listening to obscure bands no one has heard of. Outside of posting on the Cotton Babies Facebook and Instagram pages, she babysits a few cloth diaper-wearing kids and likes playing with her dogs.